cannery workers

B is for Bunkhouse

Hazel, Esther and Marg pose for the camera on the steps of No. 51 cannery house in Steveston, ca. late 1940s. Not all bunkhouses were as well maintained! Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives, G2009.028.005.

E is for E.A. Smith

A Chinese cannery worker slices the heads off salmon before they are fed into the E.A. Smith butchering machine. This worker was one of the lucky few to keep his job when the machine revolutionized the canning line. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives, CFC-3-21-9.

L is for Lead Solder

Vacuum sealing machines were introduced into canneries to replace the dangerous and time-consuming practice that preceded it – a relief to cannery workers and consumers alike! Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives, G2010.027.026.

M is for Mail Order Brides

The Murakami family house, as it stands on display today at the Britannia Heritage Shipyard, Steveston. Its original inhabitants were brought together through an unconventional form of matchmaking.

U is for Unions

United in their protest and their fun fashion sense, two ladies support the workers’ strike at the Queen Charlotte Cannery in New Masset, BC ca. mid-1950s. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives, 2000.001.003.010.

V is for Valentine

Was there more than fish in the air? Canneries were known to attract young, single workers which could lead to all sorts of fun, as seen here at Namu, BC in the mid-1950s. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives, 2000.001.003.128.